My first successful attempt grafting.
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: My first successful attempt grafting.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    God's Country....North Carolina!
    Posts
    1,127

    My first successful attempt grafting.

    Last year I ordered 12 apple trees from Century Farm Orchards here in North Carolina.

    http://www.centuryfarmorchards.com/

    I planted them on March 17th last year.

    All commercial apple trees are grafted onto some other root stock. Crab apple or something.

    One of my trees had a sprout come up from the root stock. It had to be cut anyway. Another of my trees called an "Aunt Rachel" had a very low limb about two inches from the ground that needed pruning. I saw an opportunity to try something new.

    I dug up the root stock sprout and cut it off about three inches above ground level. I split it right down the center about and inch or so. The small limb, I cut from the "Aunt Rachel" I tapered on two sides as cleanly as possible and wedged deeply in to the split until the cambium layer on each side lined up. I then wrapped the graft very tightly with tape.

    I then planted the root in a large pot with potting soil. I set it in the flower bed in our front yard and watered it from time to time.

    That was in February. Now I have large leaves budding from the top of the grafted section and from a couple of places along the length of it. Most of the buds are swelling.

    I am very excited to think that it may actually have worked, and I will be able to add another tree to the orchard!

    My twelve apple trees are:

    Aunt Rachel, Terry Winter, Old Fashioned Winesap, Liberty, Virginia Gold, Stayman Winesap, Mammoth Black twig, Gala, Bevans Favorite, King David, Hunge, and Dixie Red.





    Joshua 24:15

    And if it seem evil unto you to serve the Lord, choose you this day whom ye will serve;..... but as for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    1919a4.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    extreme northern AZ
    Posts
    3,939

    Fruit trees

    I have never had any luck grafting,they always die! About 20 years ago when we moved back into the family house we found a unknown fruit tree that someone had planted out by the barn,we moved it closer to the house,and water, and it promptly died, but then a sucker shoot sprouted out of the root ball,I figured it would just be a crab apple like I had been told that all commercial trees were grafted like yours, finally after 15 years we got blossoms that didn't get froze and got a huge crop of Granny Smiths!

  4. #3
    Apple growing is my real business.

    I've grafted all my own trees for 30 years now. Last batch had 198 takes out of 200. I grow them one year in the nursery then out to the field. Here's the real gain, take the tree out of the ground and replant it yet that morning. This way, none of the roots dry out and die, like happens with EVERY purchased tree. You gain nearly a full year's growth this way. If you are in business, time is money.
    Cogito, ergo armatum sum.

    (I think, therefore I am armed.)

  5. Remove Advertisements
    1919a4.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    At The Manassas Battlefields
    Posts
    6,183
    Wow, congratulations on successfully grafting and growing trees from root-stock, the art of the true scientific pomologist!!! Of course, now we have to make some reference to 1919's or other firearms, since this is a firearms dedicated forum. Your apple varieties sound great and we'd probably all like to stop by for a taste next time we're through that area. I grew up ('til about 35) with apples in the back yard, and the bird and I just finished two Cameo's, "discovered" in the 1980's.

    The historic Johnny Appleseed (John Chapman) planted, but did not graft, trees over much of Indiana, Ohio and the Midwest in general, most of which were non-edible varieties and good only for cider, applejack, alcohol, and establishing property rights of the orchards he planted. (He owned over 1,200 acres eventually.) He never carried a firearm or weapon of any kind, and was so animal friendly he could have been the ideal progenitor of PETA; he 'adopted broken-down horses and 'placed' them. and he had only generous settlers and Indians as companions.

    By forgoing grafting, Johnny created the conditions for apple trees to adapt and thrive in their new world home locations; the apples thus becoming indigenous and adapting to their different locations. The apple could be an apt symbol of the diversity and complexity of our melting pot, as there are almost as many apples (about 1,700 varieties by early nineteenth century) as there are people, each type with its own unique history and personality, he apple is to America as the potato is to Ireland or the olive is to Italy. "The apple...," as Virginia pomologist James Fitz proudly proclaimed in 1872, "... is our democratic fruit," but Thomas Jefferson grew primarily only four types.


    Carry On!
    Gary
    >
    -- "Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" -- Patrick Henry. (Shakespeare was right!)

    -- The Law IS the law -- Unless You ARE The Law.

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    God's Country....North Carolina!
    Posts
    1,127
    Those three seedlings coming up in the pot are actually seeds that my daughter planted in there. They are from a "Jazz" apple. This is one of my favorite "new" varieties. It is a cross between a Royal Gala and a Braeburn.

    There is no telling what they will end up tasting like if they make it to maturity, but at this point I guess we're going to find out. I really like a hard/firm apple that is on the tart side of sweet. Maybe, they'll turn out something like that.
    Joshua 24:15

    And if it seem evil unto you to serve the Lord, choose you this day whom ye will serve;..... but as for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.

  8. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by nc_reb View Post

    There is no telling what they will end up tasting like if they make it to maturity, but at this point I guess we're going to find out. I really like a hard/firm apple that is on the tart side of sweet. Maybe, they'll turn out something like that.
    doubtful you'll anything other than a sour crab. About 100 recessive genes need to come together just right to get a good apple. A great apple only comes along about once every 10,000 seeds.

    Apples were popular in pioneer days for two reasons. Everybody had a real taste for hard cider and fresh apples fought scurvy caused by the lack of vitamin C in the diet, especially in late winter.

    I've spent the entire week putting electric fence wires next to all the baby trees. Deer just LOVE fresh planted seedlings. My other solution involves high speed lead. I prefer a sniper grade AR10 with an ACOG 3.9X for this work. Hey, at least its 1919 compatible ammo


    50% of my sales is Honeycrisp, 25% is Zestar (not known outside MN), it takes the other 20 varieties for the last 25% of sales. pretty much all new breeding is for improved honeycrisp types. One of them, SugarBee, is the best apple I've ever tasted. The variety is too new to see anywhere except orchards.
    Cogito, ergo armatum sum.

    (I think, therefore I am armed.)

  9. #7
    Cogito, ergo armatum sum.

    (I think, therefore I am armed.)

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    God's Country....North Carolina!
    Posts
    1,127
    Very cool tool! I will never graft enough to need one, but if I knew one was close enough by to use, I'd sure ask.
    Joshua 24:15

    And if it seem evil unto you to serve the Lord, choose you this day whom ye will serve;..... but as for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.

  11. Remove Advertisements
    1919a4.com
    Advertisements
     

Similar Threads

  1. attempt on obama!!
    By GS-Patton in forum Open Talk
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-28-2008, 02:44 PM
  2. First attempt at riveting
    By aldfaa in forum Semi 1919a4 Building
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-04-2007, 04:54 AM
  3. Belt loader,first attempt....
    By L999here in forum Belt Loaders
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-16-2006, 07:31 AM
  4. Attempt at more pictures......
    By heckinohio in forum Open Talk
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-17-2006, 10:35 PM
  5. The UN Attempt To Control The Whole World
    By GWR1 in forum Open Talk
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 06-16-2006, 08:40 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •